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Digital Subscriptions > Classic Pop > Jan-19 > THIS MEANS EVERYTHING TO ME

THIS MEANS EVERYTHING TO ME

ALTHOUGH HE RECENTLY REACHED RETIREMENT AGE, MIDGE URE IS DETERMINED NOT TO SLOW DOWN. WANTING TO COMPENSATE FOR YEARS LOST TO ALCOHOL, THE MAN BEHIND ULTRAVOX, VISAGE AND BAND AID REVEALS HOW HE’S STILL FIGHTING TO OVERCOME HIS BOYBAND PAST.
© Andy Siddens
© Andy Siddens

Asked which song casts a shadow over Midge Ure’s life, most people would probably guess at Ultravox’s Vienna – the all-time runner-up single which lost out on No.1 to Joe Dolce’s Shaddap You Face – or Do They Know It’s Christmas?, the best-selling single of all time in Britain, which Midge co-wrote with Bob Geldof: he’s told Classic Pop before how the time spent working on Band Aid and Live Aid lost Ultravox crucial momentum and helped contribute to their demise.

Instead, Midge is frustrated at the effect that his brief spell in proto-boyband Slik has on his career, 42 years after the bubblegum popsters spent a week at No.1 with Forever And Ever. Midge is a calm and thoughtful interviewee, generally good-humoured about his status in the music industry. But whenever he mentions Slik, he gets just a little twitchy. “With first the Rich Kids and then Visage, the media held it against me that I was ‘that guy from Slik’,” he sighs. “I felt this weight lugging around with me that was never going to go. There aren’t many artists who started out in the world I did who were allowed to grow up and do anything worthy: Gary Barlow, Robbie Williams, George Michael. All these years later, I still feel sometimes the respect given to me is begrudging, because of this one hit from 1976.”

Although few people under 50 remembers Forever And Ever, Midge seethes about one Radio 2 DJ – almost certainly Chris Evans – who plays the hit whenever Midge guests on his show. “He does it as a put-down and you think, ‘What’s the point? Why do that?’ Once you’re tarred with that brush, it’s very difficult to walk away from it, and the only thing that helps is the passage of time.

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About Classic Pop

Issue 48 is on sale now! In our latest issue we look ahead to the most hotly-anticipated album of 2019 – it’s the return of Madonna. We also analyse her six personas that changed the face of pop and wax lyrical about her classic album Like A Prayer. We’ve got outrageous must-read interviews with Paul Heaton plus Echo and the Bunnymen’s Ian McCulloch and Ultravox fans will love our chat with the legendary Midge Ure. Our panel of experts look back over the year to count down their pick of the finest albums, reissues, compilations and books of 2018 and elsewhere we catch up with The Fizz to hear about their rollercoaster year as well as tracing the make-or-break record that saved The Jam’s career. We review new releases by Trevor Horn, Joe Jackson and Fun Lovin' Criminals while in our packed reissues section we look at Simple Minds, Depeche Mode, Brian Eno and much more. We also check out gigs by Heaven 17, Rick Astley and Blancmange.