Shopping Cart -

Your cart is currently empty.
Continue Shopping
This website use cookies and similar technologies to improve the site and to provide customised content and advertising. By using this site, you agree to this use. To learn more, including how to change your cookie settings, please view our Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
AU
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
   You are currently viewing the Australia version of the site.
Would you like to switch to your local site?
Digital Subscriptions > Classic Pop > Jan-19 > THE JAM TO BE SOMEONE

THE JAM TO BE SOMEONE

AFTER DROPPING THE BALL WITH THEIR UNDERCOOKED SECOND ALBUM, THE JAM WERE IN CRISIS. COULD PAUL WELLER MAKE GOOD ON HIS AMBITION TO BE A LEADER OF HIS GENERATION? IN THIS EXTRACT FROM HIS BOOK, LOVE WITH A PASSION CALLED HATE: THE INSIDE STORY OF THE JAM, SEAN EGAN TRACES THE MOMENT THE MOD TRIO WERE FORCED TO DIG DEEP TO SAVE THEIR CAREERS.
© Ian Dickson/Redferns

The Jam were arguably the most remarkable band to emerge from the late-Seventies punk revolution. Initially derided by new wavers for being uncool suburbanites, Paul Weller, Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler unexpectedly proceeded to fulfil ever y promise ever made by punk as they took social protest and cultural authenticity to the top of the charts.

From 1977 to 1982, the three-piece from Woking, Surrey, racked up 18 hits, among them the timeless likes of In The City, Down In The Tube Station At Midnight, Going Underground and Town Called Malice. Their classic albums included Setting Sons and Sound Affects. Along the way, they progressed to pop, rock and soul while never losing their punk fire. Yet their musical excellence was only the half of it: they prided themselves on remaining accessible to their fans, disdaining Americanisation and spurning commercial compromise. Although it was a blow to their army of followers, their split at the end of 1982 was hailed as the perfect illustration of their integrity: a bowing out at the top, regardless of financial temptation.

Their story, though, was more complicated than how it appeared from the outside. The group’s vaunted values were sometimes contrasted by private recrimination and duplicity. Meanwhile, their musical achievements did not constitute a seamless trajectory, but were marked by more than one upheaval that left them doubting their future.

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Classic Pop - Jan-19
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - Jan-19
$5.99
Or 599 points
Annual Digital Subscription
Only $ 3.33 per issue
SAVE
44%
Was $57.99
Now $39.99

View Issues

About Classic Pop

Issue 48 is on sale now! In our latest issue we look ahead to the most hotly-anticipated album of 2019 – it’s the return of Madonna. We also analyse her six personas that changed the face of pop and wax lyrical about her classic album Like A Prayer. We’ve got outrageous must-read interviews with Paul Heaton plus Echo and the Bunnymen’s Ian McCulloch and Ultravox fans will love our chat with the legendary Midge Ure. Our panel of experts look back over the year to count down their pick of the finest albums, reissues, compilations and books of 2018 and elsewhere we catch up with The Fizz to hear about their rollercoaster year as well as tracing the make-or-break record that saved The Jam’s career. We review new releases by Trevor Horn, Joe Jackson and Fun Lovin' Criminals while in our packed reissues section we look at Simple Minds, Depeche Mode, Brian Eno and much more. We also check out gigs by Heaven 17, Rick Astley and Blancmange.