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IGGY’S 80s

Iggy Pop entered the 1980s as a post-punk pioneer. What followed was a wild decade of wanton excess and sonic exploration. Daniel Dylan Wray hears the war stories of some of the musicians who tried (and failed) to keep up withIggy along the way

”IGGY WAS BASICALLY NAKED. ALL HELL RAINED DOWN. THE BASS PLAYER GOT A KNIFE THROWN THAT HIT HIS KNUCKLE, BOTTLES WERE FLYING PAST MY HEAD. IT WAS A BIT LIKE STEPPING INTO A ROMAN COLISEUM. IT WAS HARROWING BUT AMAZING…”

Iggy Pop’s 80s were defined by quick flashes of genius followed by longer patches of disappointment
PETER NOBLE/REDFERNS/GETTY

There are few artists whose impact reverberated quite as fiercely through the musical underground of the 1970s as Iggy Pop’s. After essentially laying down the blueprint for punk rock, by 1974 his seminal outfit The Stooges had collapsed and soon scores of artists picked up the baton to be deemed the artists of their generation as Pop watched from the sidelines.

By 1977, almost a decade after The Stooges’ debut, Pop had released not one but two solo albums in collaboration withDavid Bowie that once again leapfrogged over the current pack of musicians and supposed Zeitgeist. As countless bands were still being awoken by primitive thrashing three-chord punk, Pop had already moved past that into dark, brooding, often melancholic tones. The almost industrial-like groggy grooves that gargled and buzzed throughout The Idiot acted as a template for the incoming wave of post-punk bands, much like Stooges albums had done for the punk generation all those years earlier.

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About Long Live Vinyl

ISSUE 36 OF LONG LIVE VINYL IS NOW ON SALE! We’re turning it up to 11 this month, as Long Live Vinyl pays tribute to 50 years of Black Sabbath and the birth of heavy metal. Our cover story digs deep into the early years of Birmingham's kings of heavy rock, while we also pick out 40 essential metal albums from a genre that has twisted and evolved in multiple directions over the past half century. You’ll also want to strap yourself in as we join Iggy Pop on a debauched journey through the 1980s, and our packed features section bulges with interviews with the likes of Johnny Marr, Supergrass, Wire, Editors and Isobel Campbell. Our Classic Album feature takes a fond look at the record that emerged from the feuding egos of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young back in 1970, Deja Vu, and we sit down for a cuppa with one-of-a-kind cover artist Robert Crumb. If all that’s not enough, you’ll find the most comprehensive range of new album, reissue and hi-fi gear reviews anywhere on the newsstand. Long Live Vinyl is THE magazine for vinyl lovers…