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Digital Subscriptions > Mental Health Nursing > April/May 2018 > Celebrating and promoting radicalism

Celebrating and promoting radicalism

George Coxon highlights the importance of encouraging radical approaches in mental health care

This edition of Mental Health Nursing features a paper entitled ‘Non-violent resistance: towards a radically alternative mental health nursing practice’, contributed by Mark Batterham, Luke Cousins, Ramon Wilson and Andrew Mathers (see p13).

The paper references an article I contributed for this journal in 2015, entitled ‘Being a radical mental health nurse’, which focused on how to reclaim radicalism.

I have a broad clinical base and background, and so reading this new article posed an interesting and welcome challenge and question – how can we all approach the juxtapositioning of concepts like the various versions of radicalism in mental health with non-violent resistance in our work?

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About Mental Health Nursing

This issue features a range of news, features and papers on mental health nursing, including a student focus on carrying out assessments, an initiative to support the physical health of people with a mental illness, an evaluation of emotional intelligence tests in recruitment, an examination of non-violent resistance, an article by comedian Jake Mills on his personal experience and campaigning in mental health, an introduction to the power threat meaning framework, and an interview with Vanessa Garrity.