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Digital Subscriptions > MusicTech > Dec 2018 > GETTING THE BEST FROM SIMPLER IN ABLETON LIVE

GETTING THE BEST FROM SIMPLER IN ABLETON LIVE

Sometimes it’s good to focus on the simple things in Ableton Live, and what could be simpler than something called Simpler? It looks innocent enough, but Martin Delaney thinks it might be more powerful than you think…

ABLETON LIVE TUTORIAL

TECHNIQUE GETTING THE BEST FROM SIMPLER IN ABLETON LIVE

Today we’re talking about using Simpler exclusively as a loop playback machine. For our demo we’re working with Live 10, but if you’re using Live 9.5 or above, you’ll be fine. The first task is to load some audio into Simpler, dragging over a clip from another track, or the Browser, or computer desktop. Nope, you don’t record into Simpler directly – it’s a playback-only device.

Simpler is great if you’re working with warped material, because it retains those warp marker adjustments when you drop in the clips. Naturally this means that loops inside Simpler will change tempo alongside the song BPM automatically. Each Simpler mode has its benefits, but we’re using Classic today so make sure Loop and Warp are on. When you send MIDI notes to Simpler, you’ll trigger the loop. However, to trigger it at the original pitch you need to send a C3 note. If necessary, use the buttons to the right of the Warp button to adjust the length and half/double the playback speed of the selected sample.

Also, if you hear a pop as your loop goes round, try the Snap switch, which forces the left channel of the sample to snap to the nearest zero-crossing – the point where the waveform is at 0 dB; this can be really helpful in creating smoother loops.

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