We use cookies to track usage and preferences. See Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
AU
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
Christmas Presents
   You are currently viewing the Australia version of the site.
Would you like to switch to your local site?
Digital Subscriptions > Newsweek International > 5th May 2017 > THE HISS OF LIFE

THE HISS OF LIFE

A fast and furious plume from a frigid moon has scientists speculating about a new life form

EARTHLINGS RECENTLY came one giant step closer to finding life elsewhere in our solar system. In the final months of its 20-year mission, the spacecraft Cassini delivered its most noteworthy revelation yet: The ocean of Enceladus, a moon of Saturn, is releasing hydrogen, an energy source for some microorganisms. In other words, that ocean is inhabitable. “Enceladus,” says Cornell University astrophysicist Jonathan Lunine, “is the place to go to look for life.”

The ocean—made of liquid water and resembling a hybrid of the Atlantic Ocean, a desert mineral lake and the fluid found near hydrothermal vents—covers the entire surface of this moon. A thick shell of ice surrounds the entire body of water, though, leaving it dark and frigid. But something happening inside that ocean is strong enough to break through those miles of ice. At the moon’s southern pole, a geyser-like plume spews water vapor, ice, salt and a mix of gases hundreds of miles into space at a force of 800 miles per hour.

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Newsweek International - 5th May 2017
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - 5th May 2017
$7.99
Or 799 points
Annual Digital Subscription
Only $ 1.04 per issue
SAVE
87%
$52.99
Or 5299 points
Monthly Digital Subscription
Only $ 1.41 per issue
SAVE
81%
$5.99
Or 599 points

View Issues

About Newsweek International

ONE MILLION DEAD: WHAT WAR WITH NORTH KOREA WOULD LOOK LIKE What would another armed conflict on the peninsula look like? During the Korean War, which lasted from 1950 to 1953, some 2.7 million Koreans died, along with 33,000 Americans and 800,000 Chinese. In any pre-emption scenario now, the U.S. would try to keep the strike limited to the task at hand; at the same time, Washington would signal in any way it could, probably via the North’s ally in Beijing, that it did not seek a wider war.
Ways to Pay Pocketmags Payment Types
At Pocketmags you get Secure Billing Great Offers HTML Reader Gifting options Loyalty Points