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Digital Subscriptions > Prospect Magazine > Mar-18 > Banking on bits

Banking on bits

Cryptocurrency: tempting —but do your homework

Cryptocurrency was one of the biggest news stories of 2017, with investors clamouring to get in on the storming price gains. The price of a single Bitcoin rocketed from just under $1,000 at the start of last year to close to $20,000 in December. It has since dropped back to around half that level.

Bitcoin isn’t the only cryptocurrency out there, but it is possibly the easiest one to trade at the moment. However, Bitcoin’s value in real currency terms is incredibly volatile. A price chart for Bitcoin over the past 60 days looks like a mountain range.

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In Prospect’s March issue: A series of writers turn their thoughts to the developing war over words in the UK and the US. Lionel Shriver, Afua Hirsch, Simon Lancaster, Hugh Tomlinson, Tom Clark and two students ask if free expression is truly compromised? What’s really going on in our universities? And what do voters think? Elsewhere in the issue: Michael Ignatieff questions why today’s left-wing leaders can’t live up to the high mark set by FDR, Sameer Rahim shows how western powers have been trying to dictate what Islam should be, and Mary Beard asks “How do we look?” as our perceptions of what is beautiful have changes over the centuries.