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Digital Subscriptions > Women’s Running > March 2018 > HEALTH NEWS

HEALTH NEWS

Q & A SINCE I STARTED RUNNING AND EATING HEALTHILY, I”VE DRAMATICALLY IMPROVED MY HEALTH. I”M FITTER NOW, IN MY FORTIES, THAN I”VE EVER BEEN. HOWEVER, LAST YEAR, THE DAY AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON, I HAD A SEIZURE. I SAW A CONSULTANT AND STARTED MEDICATION. MY CONSULTANT REASSURED ME THERE IS NO EVIDENCE OF EPILEPSY BEING LINKED TO RUNNING AND THE STRESS-REDUCING EFFECTS OF RUNNING WOULD BE BENEFICIAL. HE ENCOURAGED ME TO CONTINUE. UNFORTUNATELY, I HAD ANOTHER SEIZURE THE DAY AFTER A RECENT MARATHON. DO YOU THINK THE SEIZURES COULD BE RELATED TO THE RACES? COULD IT BE AN ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCE OR SIMILAR?

I would revisit this with your consultant at your next appointment, as it does sound like you have epilepsy symptoms. In general, people with epilepsy exercise less than people without, which sadly means missing out on all the benefits exercise brings. Being diagnosed with a long-term condition is life-changing and it takes time to learn how epilepsy affects you. Triggers for seizures vary hugely between individuals and can”t always be identified. We know that tiredness, dehydration, low blood sugar and stress can be triggers and all of these are likely when running a marathon. Other issues that may play a role are sleep deprivation, missed medications and where you are in your menstrual cycle. Keeping a detailed diary might help you to identify triggers. Fuelling well during and after your race with adequate water and electrolytes may be the key for you, but unfortunately it may be that things aren”t that straightforward for you.

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About Women’s Running

Discover the healing power of running with the March issue of Women’s Running, on sale 25 January. Find out how running can help treat depressive disorders, clear the mind and manage stressful life situations. And hear from women who have experienced these benefits for themselves, such as cover star Charlie Watson, who shares how running – and blogging – has helped her to manage stress and anxiety. Keen to start running but daunted by the prospect of having to run for miles without a break? Discover Jeff Galloway’s hugely successful Run Walk Run training method, which has helped thousands to start running, stay injury free and even qualify for the Boston Marathon. We’ve got all things marathon training covered in this issue, too. You’ll find three 12-week training plans for beginner, intermediate and experienced marathoners, as well as expert advice on getting marathon fit on reduced mileage. Plus, don’t miss our recipes for delicious, homemade fuelling snacks or our leg-focused strength-training workout, both supporting your stamina and strength, whatever your training goals.