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WHY HEALTHY EATING is the BUDGET OPTION

The myth that junk food is cheaper than a healthy diet has been debunked by a new report. Amanda Ursell has thrifty tips for healthy shoppers

WE KNEW IT ALREADY, but now it’s official: eating healthily is cheaper than chips! The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) has done the sums and confirms that weight for weight, a wide range of fruit, veg and starchy carbohydrates cost £2 per kg, compared with £3 for less healthy options such as ready meals, pizzas, burgers and bacon.

HARD TO SWALLOW?

This may be difficult for some to believe, bearing in mind studies show we instinctively expect nutritious foods to cost more. Indeed, researchers have found people will rate food as healthy simply because it costs more – and even use the price of an item to judge whether it’s nutritious or not.

The IEA report, however, says good nutrition has nothing to do with cost. ‘The popular belief that obesity and poor nutrition are directly driven by economic deprivation is untenable,’ it says. ‘If the price of food was a primary consideration, everyone – particularly those on low income – would eat more fruit and vegetables.’

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