We use cookies to track usage and preferences. See Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
EU
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
Christmas Presents
   You are currently viewing the European Union version of the site.
Would you like to switch to your local site?
Digital Subscriptions > DIVA Magazine > March 2016 > Queer And Autistic

Queer And Autistic

WHAT IS LIFE LIKE FOR THOSE OF US WHO ARE QUEER AND AUTISTIC? DIVA INVESTIGATES THE HIGHS AND LOWS OF STRADDLING TWO DIFFERENT SPECTRUMS
ILLUSTRATION FERNANDO SAFONT

Living life on two spectrums

Coming out as lesbian, bi and/or trans can be fraught with challenges in and of itself. But coming out as queer and autistic is another matter entirely, and those living life on two spectrums can find themselves doubly ostracised, doubly oppressed and completely invisible in a world that struggles to understand and embrace difference.

A neurological condition, autism is a spectrum disorder that affects around one in every 100 people in the UK. It is a lifelong developmental disability which impacts how people perceive, think about and interact with the world, and people with autism tend to struggle with social interaction and communication. That can mean having difficulty with eye contact, facial expressions, body language or gestures, and many autistic people say they find it hard to understand the emotions of others. Some autistic people are also sensitive to stimuli including light and noise, and one way of dealing with this is self-stimulatory behaviour, also known as stimming, such as hand flapping, rocking or finger snapping. Autism is an extremely diverse condition, and how one experiences autism changes from person to person. For some, their diagnosis means they need high levels of support including speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, educational support and more. But for others, autism is a hidden condition and can go undiagnosed for years.

“I have a full-time job, I drive, I have a long-term partner,” says Cassie, a 30-year-old bi woman who was 26 before she was diagnosed with autism. “I also cry and press my hands over my ears when the washing machine goes into its spin cycle. I can’t recognise my own partner’s face sometimes.”

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of DIVA Magazine - March 2016
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - March 2016
€4.49
Or 449 points
Annual Digital Subscription
Only € 2.42 per issue
SAVE
46%
€28.99
Or 2899 points
6 Month Digital Subscription
Only € 2.50 per issue
SAVE
44%
€14.99
Or 1499 points
Monthly Digital Subscription
Only € 3.49 per issue
SAVE
22%
€3.49
Or 349 points

View Issues

About DIVA Magazine

Sarah Paulson (American Horror Story, Carol, 12 Years A Slave) talks with refreshing openness about her work, her relationships and inadvertently coming out in our in depth interview with her. Also in this issue: BFI Flare - Our pick of this years festival. Kaitlyn Alexander. Will "the lesbian Netflix" change the face of lez and bi culture? Transgender parenting. Interactive artist and activist Maya Choudhury. What is life like for those who are queer and autistic? LGBT history in museums. DIVA's history quiz. Jacky Fleming. Why has bi-activist Charlotte Dingle befriended her school bully? Meet the couple behind lesbian card company, Slamsister designs. Travel with us to Spanish lesbian resort, Bambu or find romance in New York. Plus all the very best in life, scene, books, film, music and TV.
Ways to Pay Pocketmags Payment Types
At Pocketmags you get Secure Billing Great Offers HTML Reader Gifting options Loyalty Points