Shopping Cart -

Your cart is currently empty.
This website use cookies and similar technologies to improve the site and to provide customised content and advertising. By using this site, you agree to this use. To learn more, including how to change your cookie settings, please view our Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
IT
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
   You are currently viewing the Italy version of the site.
Would you like to switch to your local site?
Leggi ovunque Read anywhere
Modalità di pagamento Pocketmags Payment Types
Trusted site
A Pocketmags si ottiene
Fatturazione sicura
Ultime offerte
Web & App Reader
Regali
Loyalty Points

SPIRIT

HAVING COMPLETED A TRILOGY OF ALBUMS, IT WAS TIME FOR DEPECHE MODE TO DO SOMETHING RADICALLY DIFFERENT ON SPIRIT. WITH THE WORLD AROUND THEM TOO FRACTIOUS AND TOO DIVIDED TO IGNORE, IT WAS TIME FOR DEPECHE TO GO ON THE ATTACK. AIDED BY A STUNNING OPENING QUARTET OF POLITICAL VENGEANCE, SPIRIT IS EITHER A ONE-OFF – OR THE FUTURE OF DEPECHE MODE…

It wasn’t perhaps obvious that Delta Machine had been the concluding part of a trilogy. Dave Gahan talked a good game when explaining in the run-up to Spirit that Depeche’s previous three longplayers should be considered as a “run” of albums. True, they’d all been produced by Ben Hillier… but it’s unlikely that future generations of fans will consider Hillier’s work to form a linked artistic triptych to rival, say, The Cure’s Trilogy tour of Pornography, Disintegration and Bloodflowers.

Although Andy Fletcher has since somewhat waspishly stated that Hillier’s production was a bit full-on at times, any failings on the previous three albums shouldn’t be attributed to a capable producer like Hillier. Instead, in retrospect Delta Machine seems to draw a line in the sand for the internal politics that had frequently threatened to rise, like a whack-a-mole, to see off Depeche for good. Playing The Angel, Sounds Of The Universe and Delta Machine are far from terrible albums. The latter, in particular, is an exemplar of their doomier internal monologues. But nor are any of the three likely to be mentioned among most Depeche fans’ all-time faves. Unlike Spirit… The making of Spirit wasn’t without its tensions, as Dave Gahan muttered darkly about feeling dismissed by Martin Gore for apparently failing to see the metaphor of life’s beauty in Cover Me, one of four songs the singer co-writes on Spirit. But, as Gahan stated, he and Depeche’s perennially established songwriter had finally recognised each other’s place in the band.

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Classic Pop Presents - Depeche Mode
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - Depeche Mode
€6,99
Or 699 points

View Issues

About Classic Pop Presents

In our latest special edition 132-page magazine we explore the world of synth-pop pioneers Depeche Mode. We follow the band’s epic story – decade-by-decade – from their genesis in Basildon as synth-loving adolescents with Vince Clarke at the helm, through to the present day as a globally famous three-piece with over 100 million record sales under their belts. Classic Pop Presents turn the spotlight onto classic albums from every era of the group’s evolution including Speak & Spell, Black Celebration, Violator, Songs Of Faith And Devotion, Exciter and latest LP Spirit – plus, we go behind the scenes via exclusive interviews with Depeche’s Martin Gore and Dave Gahan, as well as producers Tim Simenon, Ben Hillier and James Ford. We also sit down with the two directors of pioneering tour film 101 to hear how they captured the reality of ‘Mode on the road’. Also inside, we deliver our definitive Top 40 Depeche Mode playlist as well as highlighting some lesser-spun gems; we survey the band’s videography and revisit their mammoth global tours through the years. Add to that our in-depth feature on Depeche’s many collaborators, our investigation into collectable vinyl from their back catalogue and much more besides – it’s an unmissable issue!