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Digital Subscriptions > Cottage Life > Jun/Jul 2019 > “ I CALL IT FORAGING FOR DINNER ”

“ I CALL IT FORAGING FOR DINNER ”

Dinner is on a stretch of lat, pink-swirled granite, on a tiny island a 40-minute boat ride from the cotage. “My father goes crazy when I use cotage pots and pans on the fire,” Derek says, as two cast iron frying pans are well on their way to blackening in the campfire he’s set. His parents (now divorced) were into camping as well as cotaging when he was young, always towing a boat behind their station wagon. “Derek started driving the boat when he was four, standing at the wheel with me beside him,” D’Arcy says. “And, as he got a litle older, he had lots of time to fool around with things like bannock on sticks, learning to control foods on a fire.”

The late-day breeze carries the scent of fish frying in buter, but it’s no simple shore dinner, it’s another ecosystem on a plate: “Pickerel in the Shallows” (see recipe, opposite). Derek places the still-sizzling illets—sautéed with lemon thyme—on a bed of creamy sunchoke purée. (Also known as Jerusalem artichokes, sunchokes grow wild throughout Canada.) He adds cattail “hearts,” (the tender inner stalk), nasturtium leaves (which look like miniature lily pads), and a few sorrel leaves (for more lemony lavour) to the sunchoke shallows. Madeleine opens a botle of orange wine, which is made from white-wine grapes fermented with their skins on. Orange is the new white in her world, and she thinks it has an “earthier, more savoury quality” that will stand up well to the meaty pickerel and sweet, nuty sunchoke. It’s all outrageously delicious.

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About Cottage Life

Find your wild side with the June/July 2019 issue of Cottage Life! The lake is where we let loose and get in touch with nature. In this issue you’ll hear from Canadian writers Heather O’Neill, Andrew Pyper, Lisa Moore, Clive Thompson, and Elamin Abdelmahmoud on how they go wild at the cottage. You’ll get inspired by a cottager who forages his woods for dinner and meet the people behind the (thriving) honeybees of Georgina Island. Want to know how five people share a 720 sq. ft. cabin? We’ll give you a peek inside a tiny East Coast cabin. We’ll show you the coolest swim raft we’ve ever seen and tell you about the best (ready-made) Caesars. You’ll get to know wetlands: how they help manage floods and keep our lakes clean, and how to protect them. If you’re planning a big party, we’ll tell you what permits and insurance to get. You’ll find fixes for your hot and stuffy sleeping loft and a sagging shelf. Plus, we’ll get you up to date on how vacancy taxes could affect cottage properties. Pick up the June/July issue of Cottage Life…ready, set, let go!