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Digital Subscriptions > Long Live Vinyl > Oct-18 > WILL AT HOME WITH SERGEANT

WILL AT HOME WITH SERGEANT

Beginning with their 1980 debut, Echo And The Bunnymen have released many vinyl classics of their own. Jennifer Otter Bickerdike takes a tour of guitarist Will Sergeant’s collection…

The Pretty In Pink movie soundtrack introduced all kinds of exotic music to this writer’s Californian ears. Mysterious, beautiful tracks by British bands that so succinctly seemed to capture the endless possibility of youth. I used to argue with one of my best friends, Brett, about which was better – The Bunnymen’s Ocean Rain or The Smiths’ Strangeways, Here We Come (my obsession at the time). These songs, these albums, have travelled with me around the world, taking on different meanings, shades of nostalgia and that same evolving idea they encapsulated all those years ago.

When we arrive at Bunnymen guitarist Will Sergeant’s house, it’s a beautiful, sunny day. Potted plants and herbs line the wood deck, with a sprawling garden behind. The front door is massive and gothic, as if it could have been lifted straight from the pages of Bram Stoker. We’re not surprised when Will reveals that the residence was once a mausoleum – Killing Moon, indeed. We settle down with our cuppas, and get down to the business of talking records, Lost Boys and top tips for a beautiful yard.

Music played a big role in Will’s life from an early age. “I’ve been collecting records since I was a little kid”, he explains. “My life is represented by my vinyl! My first vinyl memory was probably when I was about 10, 11. I used to hang around with this lad called Richard. His brother had the Magical Mystery Tour gatefold double single. He also had an album by Gustav Holst called The Planets. We were fascinated by it. It’s all about the Solar System; each planet has its own section on this orchestral LP. Later on, I started watching Top Of The Pops.

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About Long Live Vinyl

Issue 19 of Long Live Vinyl is now on sale. 50 years on from the release of Jimi Hendrix’s career masterpiece, Electric Ladyland, we speak to some of the key figures in the making of the album, flick through Jimi’s entire record collection and round up 20 essential Hendrix releases on vinyl that no true fan should be without. Elsewhere this issue, we get the inside track on Spiritualized‘s first new album in six years from Jason Pierce and meet Anna Calvi to hear how she made her boldest and most articulate record to date, the outstanding The Hunter. We also reflect on a trio of 50th anniversaries, as Wayne Kramer tells Long Live Vinyl about half a century in the MC5 and we take in-depth looks at Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks and The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society – the latest in BMG’s Art Of The Album series. Echo & The Bunnymen guitarist Will Sergeant gives us a private tour of his record collection, The Trip heads to the East Midlands to visit the record shops of Nottingham, and we meet the team behind Eel Pie Records in Twickenham. If all that’s not enough, we bring you the most extensive range of new album, reissue, turntable and accessory reviews, plus expert buying advice, anywhere on the newsstand.