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23 MIN READ TIME

Newly Revealed Secret DoD ‘UFO’ Project Less Than Meets the Eye

BENJAMIN RADFORD

In December 2017, The New York Times reported on the existence of a secret U.S. Department of Defense program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), which sought to research unidentified aerial objects. It began in 2008 and ended in 2012, costing an estimated $22 million over its course.

One of the Times piece’s coauthors, Leslie Kean, has a documented history of championing UFO reports that turned out to be mistakes and hoaxes.

One of the Times piece’s coauthors, Leslie Kean, has a documented history of championing UFO reports that turned out to be mistakes and hoaxes. In one case Kean vouched for a famous photo taken in 1990 by a man known only as “Patrick” in the Belgian town of Petit-Rechain. “Patrick” later confessed that the image, twice deemed authentic by a panel of distinguished scientists and experts, was really of a small piece of triangular Styrofoam spray-painted black with lights attached.

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The War on Science, Anti-Intellectualism, and ‘Alternative Ways of Knowing’ in 21st-Century America

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Other Articles in this Issue


Editor’s Letter
When CSICOP and the Skeptical Inquirer were founded, in 1976,
NEWS AND COMMENT
A staple of science fiction has always been aliens from
It resembles a scene from a James Bond film. Between
A committee of twenty Cuban scientists tasked with examining the
Six new fellows have been elected to the Committee for
It’s finally happened. Homeopathic remedies are going to come under
Julie Payette is far from your usual bureaucratic official. Even
New Mexico has a vibrant scientific co mmunity, with two
COMMENTARY
I have often written in the Skeptical Inquirer about how
CONFERENCE REPORT
A Festival of Scientific Skepticism or a Theme Park for Science and Reason? CSICon Las Vegas 2017 Had It All
Center for Inquiry (CFI) Communications Director Paul Fidalgo covered CSICon 2017 “live” for CFI Live in a series of brief reports on CFI’s website. Here are a few selections. (For others, go to centerforinquiry.live/2017.)
INVESTIGATIVE FILES
David Dominé is author of a series of three books
THE SCIENCE OF SCIENCE COMMUNICATION
Harnessing the Power of Opinion-Leaders across Communities
BEHAVIOR & BELIEF
Let us stipulate that there is no magic. Sleight-of-hand, deception,
SKEPTICAL INQUIREE
Q: “I enjoyed your recent investigation into the 2016 Mall
FEATURES
The decades-long academic assault on science has bewildered the American public about the role and function of science, promoted anti-intellectualism, and politically empowered purveyors of supernaturalism and paranormal beliefs
There are several flagrant examples of hype from cancer and cardiac therapy. The drugs Avastin and Opdivo, which have serious problems, have been greatly overhyped. Statins, which are effective in saving lives from heart attacks and stroke, have been subjected to negative hype meant to discourage their use
Here’s a geologist’s critical analysis of false perceptions held by many creationists about the origin of the Grand Canyon and the age of the Earth
Rather than creating a glorious new literature of positive art, Colin Wilson delivered an odd mix of dodgy philosophy, pulp novels, and paranormal studies—the latter often downright silly
REVIEWS
For most of human history, people have assumed that some
When odd birds sing their strange songs, does it change
NEW AND NOTABLE
Listing does not preclude future review
You Are the Universe: Discovering Your Cosmic Self and Why
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
In Jeffrey Debies-Carl’s conspiracy legends article in the November/December 2017
THE LAST LAUGH
I’m not sure I get the point of the story