Shopping Cart -

Your cart is currently empty.
This website use cookies and similar technologies to improve the site and to provide customised content and advertising. By using this site, you agree to this use. To learn more, including how to change your cookie settings, please view our Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
IT
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
   You are currently viewing the Italy version of the site.
Would you like to switch to your local site?
Leggi ovunque Read anywhere
Modalità di pagamento Pocketmags Payment Types
Trusted site
A Pocketmags si ottiene
Fatturazione sicura
Ultime offerte
Web & App Reader
Regali
Loyalty Points

Reviews

Your monthly critical round-up of performances, recordings and publications

CONCERTS

New York

Joshua Roman and Conor Hanick: thoughtf ully programmed recital in the crypt
KEVIN CONDON

JOSHUA ROMAN (CELLO)

CONOR HANICK (PIANO)

CHURCH OF THE INTERCESSION 18 SEPTEMBER 2019

Joshua Roman and Conor Hanick presented an evening of music thoughtfully tailored to match the intimate and yet also somewhat cavernous space of the crypt at the Church of the Intercession. The presenter announced at the outset that there would be no clapping between pieces, enhancing the intensity of each work and creating a certain emotional ambience during the silence. The opening arpeggiation of Arvo Pa’s Fratres was just right, perfectly voiced with clear intonation. The piece continued well, and Roman gets around the instrument with much finesse, but I prefer an interpretation with less vibrato and a more pure sound.

Schnittke’s 1978 Sonata followed, featuring impressive cello playing and often extreme tenderness from the piano. It is not an easy piece to hear and needed a stronger sense of hierarchy and definition within and between the phrases. The duo played with formidable intensity and force of sound but the piece needed a little more space to breathe. The final Pa, Spiegel im Spiegel, was exactly right: uncomplicated beauty, played with a simple, sonorous tone and incredible ensemble. Roman has a uniquely special sound on his C string - clear and beautiful and yet stunningly rich without being throaty.

After the performance, Roman finally spoke to the audience - which he does well - and introduced his encore as an ‘intensely personal reflection’ on where he comes from. He played - and sang - an arrangement of Leonard Cohen’s song Hallelujah that was undoubtedly the best-performed work on the programme. Roman’s connection to the song was abundantly evident, and his lyrical, heartfelt playing was quite powerful. He invited the audience to sing along in the final chorus, creating a feeling of camaraderie and warmth within the somewhat lonely crypt.

LEAH HOLLINGSWORTH

THIS MONTH’S RECOMMENDED RECORDINGS

Our pick of the new releases

Challenging concepts from

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

PAGE 96

Quatuor Voce performs Mozart and Schubert

PAGE 96

Fantasti c debut recital from

Tessa Lark

PAGE 99

• To browse through more than a decade of The Strad ‘s recording reviews, visitwww.thestrad.com/reviews

JACK QUARTET, EITHER/OR,

RICHARD CARRICK (CONDUCTOR)

MILLER THEATRE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 25 SEPTEMBER 2019

In this exuberant evening – dedicated to the work of iconoclastic composer Anthony Braxton – opening the new season at Miller Theatre, the Jack Quartet musicians were giddier than I’ve ever seen them. In the first half, they performed Composition no.17 (1971), rife with options. As Lara Pellegrinelli explained in admirably lucid programme notes, the four parts ‘can be played by any instrument’, and their three sections ‘in any order for any length of time’. Additional choices were made by the players, led by the first violinist (Austin Wulliman). In the memorable final bars, a sustained scratch was capped by a brief, offhand gesture in the cello (Jay Campbell).

The real fun, however, occurred after the interval, when six of Braxton’s ‘compositions’ – nos.17 (again), 18, 40(O), 101, 168 and 358 (written between 1971 and 2006) – were done simultaneously, with the Jack crew joining twelve musicians from Either/Or. The fascinating fray incorporated no.18 (1971) for string quartet, whose freewheeling requirements focus on ‘sliding sound techniques’, adding to a 40-minute, over-the-top experiment in dense, raucous urbanity. During the avalanche, violinist Christopher Otto occasionally shouted instructions to violist John Pickford Richards, each in turn giving hand signals across the stage to Either/Or (wind, brass, percussion and double bass). String quartet communication has rarely been vaulted to such a mad zenith.

BRUCE HODGES

ISRAELI CHAMBER PROJECT

MERKIN CONCERT HALL 26 SEPTEMBER 2019

The Israeli Chamber Project presented a vibrant programme organised around the idea of how folk music influences concert music. It highlighted the music of Bruch and Bart-specially, and quite cleverly presented selections from both Bruch’s Eight Pieces for clarinet, viola and piano and Bart 44 Duos for two violins – breaking them up into groups of three and interspersing them among the other works on the programme. The Bruch was played with tremendous phrasing and gorgeous sound from the trio, with great direction and long lines. The Bartffuo movements were a delight, each one played with vivacity, great energy and fantastic passion and character. The pizzicato movement was stunning in its clarity and control. Gyo Kurt৒s miniature pieces Hommage o. Schumann were played with a true sense of respect for the style, and the piano dynamics were impressively delicate. Martin?’s Three Madrigals for violin and viola were delightful: the accompaniment was always a bit inflected, influenced by the melody and chord progressions, and the violin lines soared beautifully in the first movement. The range and variety of colours achieved in the opening muted section of the Poco andante was truly astounding, and the final movement concluded with evident love for the music. Dvo?૒s op.74 Terzetto closed the programme – and it seemed that they had saved the best till last. The opening was gorgeously played, with elegant timing and phrasing. The transition into the Larghetto was artful, and the trio boasted flawless ensemble in the Scherzo, which had a proper Hungarian feel.

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of The Strad - December 2019
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - December 2019
€5,49
Or 549 points
Annual Digital Subscription
Only € 3,25 per issue
SAVE
41%
Was €54,99
Now €38,99

View Issues

About The Strad

We examine the 1677 ‘Romanov’ Nicolò Amati viola and the Royal Danish Orchestra’s instrument collection. Manfred Honeck explains how playing viola informs his conducting and Linus Roth discusses Weinberg. Plus the first in a two-part Berg Masterclass, with Leila Josefowicz.