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Digital Subscriptions > Men's Running > March 2019 > WHAT’S YOUR TYPE?

WHAT’S YOUR TYPE?

NOT BLONDES OR BRUNETTES, BUT BODY TYPES; WHETHER YOU’RE TALL AND SKINNY OR SHORT AND STOCKY, YOUR TRAINING AND NUTRITION CHOICES SHOULD BE TAILORED TO YOUR GENETIC MAKEUP

MAKE 2019 A PB YEAR!

You are what you eat, the saying goes. But that’s not all – you’re also what you are, in the sense that we are all born with a body type that’s determined by genetics, rather than by calories alone.

Much of the modern research about ectomorphs, endomorphs and mesomorphs – read on to find out which one you are – is applied to muscle building, but your body shape affects how you should train and eat for running as well.

There’s just one caveat: don’t get hung up on it. “We need to be aware that discussions about performance can affect body image,” says Tom Craggs (runningwithus.com). “You need to embrace the shape you’ve got and maximise the benefits that come from your body type.”

THE ECTOMORPH

If you’re tall, lean and you find it hard to gain muscle, you’re an ectomorph. Chances are you have a flat chest and slim waist. You may actually look vaguely like an elite athlete in your kit, but being an ectomorph doesn’t automatically mean you’re fit for running.

There’s one obvious drawback: your skinny frame may well mean you lack power. “Your relative lack of bulk increases the risk of injury, so it’s worth adding power by undertaking a strength programme,” says Craggs. “This is particularly important for the joints, which can be vulnerable in endurance athletes. It will also help maintain form and technique during races or long runs.”

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About Men's Running

For the last three years running, I’ve had the same New Year’s resolutions: to learn Japanese and to play electric guitar. I’m not sure what the sell-by date of these should be but to suffice to say I can say ‘goodbye’ in Japanese and the only riff I know is Deep Purple’s Smoke on the Water – hardly the stuff rock legends are made of. But, more happily, my running resolutions are already proving more successful this year. First, was just to run more often. Lifestyle changes, dodgy Achilles and lack of motivation meant that the last two years have been something of a running wilderness. But renewed enthusiasm over the last 12 months has seen a return to something approaching form and my goal to improve all-round strength is definitely working. I’m running fewer miles but a focus on conditioning has seen marked improvement. Thankfully, this month’s guide lays the foundations for making 2019 your best running year. From top advice on how to nail your tempo running to how to improve your mental focus; the best time of day to run and how to come back from injury, we’ve brought everything together to make sure 2019 is a PB year!