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Digital Subscriptions > MusicTech > Oct 2019 > USING GUITARS IN ABLETON LIVE

USING GUITARS IN ABLETON LIVE

Ableton Live has matured as a production and performance platform – and Live 10 in particular has so much to offer guitarists and bass players, whether they’re technophobes or dedicated gear-heads. Strap it on and plug it in!

TECHNIQUE USING GUITARS IN ABLETON LIVE 10

ABLETON LIVE TUTORIAL

For a long time, it seemed like guitarists were resisting using computers. However, a new generation of guitarists are far more comfortable with software, computers and mobile devices, so there’s no excuse for anyone to be a tech hold-out. Ableton Live has always been versatile and that’s just as true for guitarists and bass players as for synth heads or anybody else. You can put it to work for practice, performance, looping, control, and production, using it instead of, or alongside, your beloved hardware.

It also makes for a fantastic portable mini-rig if you need to travel light. Live 10 in particular has added features that make it easier than ever to run a fully functional computer guitar rig. Use it to reproduce your current sound in a digital format, or expand into entirely new sonic territory.

GUITAR, MEET DAW

You can use any audio interface that has an instrument input, although not all are created equal – you want a clean signal with plenty of gain, otherwise you’ll have to add external boosters, which is kind of against the point. If you’re likely to have a lot of music gear connected, then Live 10 allows you go into Preferences and name each audio input and output, which can make it faster to set up.

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About MusicTech

The art of writing songs is something that is all too often ascribed to some mythical gift that manifests itself within people at a certain age, with little thought given to the long periods of trial and error, dedication to the craft and persistence to forge a career in the industry that mark out many successful songwriters. In this issue, we have a thorough exploration of the topic, featuring a dissection of the building blocks of every hit song, as well as industry insight from a range of experts who illuminate the professional songwriting world of 2019. We discuss maintaining a career balancing writing with being an artist in your own right with Ed Harcourt and learn from Bernard Butler, Paul Statham and others about their approaches to educating the next generation of hit-makers. Elsewhere in the issue, we continue our journey through the world of synthesis. This time, we focus on wavetable and vector synthesis as well as a foray into the birth of drum machines and their intrinsic relationship with the synth world. We also put several of our go-to budget small-diaphragm condensers to the test in our very first microphone shootout. In our review section this month, we get rhythmic with IK Multimedia’s UNO Drum and wallow in the sonic delights of the Dreadbox Nyx V2 among many other new pieces of kit. Of course, we also have a range of tutorials and tips, too. I hope you enjoy the issue.