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Digital Subscriptions > Psychologies > No. 158 > ” No one else can truly know what a person is feeling and I think, most of the time, we’d rather not find out”

” No one else can truly know what a person is feeling and I think, most of the time, we’d rather not find out”

Award-winning actress Amy Adams opens up about pain, and exploring the dark recesses of a troubled woman’s psyche in new HBO series, Sharp Objects, which she also produce

interview

She may have won two Golden Globes and been nominated for five Academy Awards but, when it comes to defining exactly what it is that makes Amy Adams such a captivating performer, the truth is not easy to pinpoint.

Certainly, her breadth of work is impressive, starring in breezy comedies like Enchanted and The Muppets, gritty dramas such as The Fighter and American Hustle, offbeat gems Her and Nocturnal Animals, not to mention her recurring turn as Superman’s sweetheart Lois Lane in three DC Comics blockbusters (and counting)… but the real secret to the actress’s success appears to be her ability to truly embody the characters she tackles – there are no flimsy efforts and no whimsical portrayals; Adams has become a master of authentic characterisation.

Her talent for complete immersion in a script comes from a raw fascination for, and dedication to, her craft. ‘For each character, I build a psychological backstory from the age of around three – I’ll imagine their whole life leading up to the present day’, she says. That’s no mean feat: the capability to delve deeply into a character’s soul, to imagine and fantasise about their life, while staying grounded in ‘being Amy’, who, it quickly becomes clear, is a light-hearted, effervescent and humorous person.

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