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Digital Subscriptions > Skeptic > 24.1 > D&D’s TRIUMPHANT RETURN

D&D’s TRIUMPHANT RETURN

Eventually the Satanic Panic faded away. The FBI concluded that there is no hidden network of Satanic cults. Innocent people who were falsely accused of being Satanists were released. In one such case, a couple was finally declared innocent after 21 years in prison. They were paid more than three million dollars to help make up for the unfairness of their treatment.

Fears about D&D also faded. Pulling passed away in the 1990s. Parents worried instead about violent video games.

Today, Dungeons & Dragons is wildly popular once again. People who grew up loving the game have eagerly shared it with their children and students. D&D features prominently in recent popular media such as the Netflix television series Stranger Things. (The show’s main monster is named after a creature from the Monster Manual.) Fiction writers have also been inspired by the Satanic Panic and its fears about D&D. Netflix’s teen series Riverdale features a fictional game called “Gryphons & Gargoyles” that causes madness and death. The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina (also for mature teens) imagines a hidden coven of Devil worshipping witches.

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About Skeptic

BEHE’S LAST STAND COLUMNS The SkepDoc: Is Low-Dose Radiation Good for You? The Questionable Claims for Hormesis, by Harriet Hall, M.D. • The Gadfly: Define Your Terms (or, Here we Go Again), by Carol Tavris ARTICLES Making Gasoline from Water: John Andrews and the Invention of a Legend • Online Gaming: A Virtual Experiment in the Dark Side of Human Nature • Duped by Data Mining • How Science Will Explain and Fix Fake News • The Cult of Falun Gong: A Dance Troupe and Victimhood Raises Big Money • The Opioid Epidemic Misunderstood • Why the Human-Centered View Has Not Served us Well • Behe’s Last Stand: The Lion of Intelligent Design Roars Again • Straw Man on a Slippery Slope: The Case Against the Case Against Postmodernism • A Disproof of God’s Existence REVIEWS Reviews of: The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure; The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe: How to Know What’s Really Real in a World Increasingly Full of Fake; Investigating Ghosts: The Scientific Search for Spirits; Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post- Facts, and Fake News; Hoax: A History of Deception: 5000 Years of Fakes, Forgeries, and Fallacies; Truth’s Fool: Derek Freeman and the War Over Anthropology JUNIOR SKEPTIC Quest for the Truth about Dungeons and Dragons