Shopping Cart -

Your cart is currently empty.
Continue Shopping
This website use cookies and similar technologies to improve the site and to provide customised content and advertising. By using this site, you agree to this use. To learn more, including how to change your cookie settings, please view our Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
US
Pocketmags Digital Magazines

How Katrina drove New Orleans to be a pioneer in data management

Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in August 2005 causing over US$125 billion of property damage (Source: US National Hurricane Center)
Photo: Isselee/Dreamstime

There aren’t many positive outcomes associated with natural disasters but in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which struck New Orleans in 2005, the urgent need for the better management of data was apparent.

The city began to use data to improve and speed-up decision making, which was essential to the city’s recovery. Government officials realised they needed GIS data, information about properties, and a way to contact owners and to engage with them to start renovating properties.

“We had to get really sophisticated very quickly in how we used information, and that data became a weapon for us and a great resource,” says Kimberly W. LaGrue, Chief Information Officer, City of New Orleans. “One of the most important things for us to address at the time was blight. The number of homes that had not been repaired or even started repair work was concerning to the mayor and his administration.”

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Cities Today - October 2019
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - October 2019
FREE
Read Now!
Getting free sample issues is easy, but we need to add it to an account to read, so please follow the instructions to read your free issue today.
Email Address

View Issues

About Cities Today

How Hurricane Katrina drove New Orleans to be a pioneer in data management “We quickly learned to value data” Kimberly W. LaGrue, Chief Information Officer, City of New Orleans