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Classic Car Buyer Magazine no.201 Morris Minor- Buy and Run Back Issue

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32 Reviews   •  English   •   Aviation & Transport (Automotive)
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Do you like cars or do you like driving? If that seems like a silly question, let me
explain what I’m going on about: Some people see cars as a means to go driving and tend to prefer
cars that enhance that experience and the faster, sharper and rawer the experience the better. A car
that, by design, removes you from the driving experience by majoring
on comfort, lightness of touch and luxury isn’t going to be their cup
of tea. Then there’s the other camp, which is the one I’m now realising that I fall into. Whether a car is slow or quick, spartan or luxurious, cosseting or bone-shaking, it is what it is and driving it is the way to experience the car rather than the other way around. What has brought on this bout of introspection is that I have finally driven a hydropneumatic Citroën. This is just as well, as I will bore
anyone in earshot with my views on ‘proper’ Citroëns and how wonderful they are from a technical
perspective, always with the nagging thought that I had no idea ifthey were any good to drive.
I’m pleased to report that the experience was exactly as I had
expected – the big ’Fifties Citroën is probably the slowest car I have ever driven and with its dedication to removing any impression of actual motion or progress it is the polar opposite of a ‘driver’s car’. However I found that feeling (and hearing) the suspension soaking up every imperfection in the road, or using the finger-light column gearchange (which felt as if it wasn’t attached to anything at the other end) was just as satisfying as thrashing a sports car along a back road and feeling each grain of tarmac through the steering wheel or having to feather
the throttle to keep the back end in line. I suppose some people would
dislike the Citroën for its complete lack of driver appeal, but surely that’s rather missing the point of the exercise? Anyway, regardless of whether you like cars, driving, driving cars,
or cars that you can drive, there should be something in this issue
of CCB.
read more read less
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Classic Car Buyer

no.201 Morris Minor- Buy and Run Do you like cars or do you like driving? If that seems like a silly question, let me explain what I’m going on about: Some people see cars as a means to go driving and tend to prefer cars that enhance that experience and the faster, sharper and rawer the experience the better. A car that, by design, removes you from the driving experience by majoring on comfort, lightness of touch and luxury isn’t going to be their cup of tea. Then there’s the other camp, which is the one I’m now realising that I fall into. Whether a car is slow or quick, spartan or luxurious, cosseting or bone-shaking, it is what it is and driving it is the way to experience the car rather than the other way around. What has brought on this bout of introspection is that I have finally driven a hydropneumatic Citroën. This is just as well, as I will bore anyone in earshot with my views on ‘proper’ Citroëns and how wonderful they are from a technical perspective, always with the nagging thought that I had no idea ifthey were any good to drive. I’m pleased to report that the experience was exactly as I had expected – the big ’Fifties Citroën is probably the slowest car I have ever driven and with its dedication to removing any impression of actual motion or progress it is the polar opposite of a ‘driver’s car’. However I found that feeling (and hearing) the suspension soaking up every imperfection in the road, or using the finger-light column gearchange (which felt as if it wasn’t attached to anything at the other end) was just as satisfying as thrashing a sports car along a back road and feeling each grain of tarmac through the steering wheel or having to feather the throttle to keep the back end in line. I suppose some people would dislike the Citroën for its complete lack of driver appeal, but surely that’s rather missing the point of the exercise? Anyway, regardless of whether you like cars, driving, driving cars, or cars that you can drive, there should be something in this issue of CCB.


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Classic Car Buyer  |  no.201 Morris Minor- Buy and Run  


Do you like cars or do you like driving? If that seems like a silly question, let me
explain what I’m going on about: Some people see cars as a means to go driving and tend to prefer
cars that enhance that experience and the faster, sharper and rawer the experience the better. A car
that, by design, removes you from the driving experience by majoring
on comfort, lightness of touch and luxury isn’t going to be their cup
of tea. Then there’s the other camp, which is the one I’m now realising that I fall into. Whether a car is slow or quick, spartan or luxurious, cosseting or bone-shaking, it is what it is and driving it is the way to experience the car rather than the other way around. What has brought on this bout of introspection is that I have finally driven a hydropneumatic Citroën. This is just as well, as I will bore
anyone in earshot with my views on ‘proper’ Citroëns and how wonderful they are from a technical
perspective, always with the nagging thought that I had no idea ifthey were any good to drive.
I’m pleased to report that the experience was exactly as I had
expected – the big ’Fifties Citroën is probably the slowest car I have ever driven and with its dedication to removing any impression of actual motion or progress it is the polar opposite of a ‘driver’s car’. However I found that feeling (and hearing) the suspension soaking up every imperfection in the road, or using the finger-light column gearchange (which felt as if it wasn’t attached to anything at the other end) was just as satisfying as thrashing a sports car along a back road and feeling each grain of tarmac through the steering wheel or having to feather
the throttle to keep the back end in line. I suppose some people would
dislike the Citroën for its complete lack of driver appeal, but surely that’s rather missing the point of the exercise? Anyway, regardless of whether you like cars, driving, driving cars,
or cars that you can drive, there should be something in this issue
of CCB.
read more read less
Classic Car Buyer is Britain’s leading weekly newspaper for classic car enthusiasts. Out every Wednesday, it’s packed with the biggest and most comprehensive news section plus auction reports and events - anything related to the classic car scene, you can read about here first. In addition, you’ll also find in-depth features covering all aspects of owning a classic car – buying, maintaining, driving and – crucially - enjoying. There are comprehensive buying guides, informative road tests, a nostalgic pull-out spread depicting a scene from the halcyon days of motoring, staff car sagas, guest columnists, market reviews, a detailed club directory and a regularly updated price guide. The publication is also packed with hundreds of cars and parts for sale in its Free Ads section, making it THE place to buy or sell your classic. There is a dedicated classifieds spread on classic commercial vehicles and machinery. Classic Car Buyer provides the best insight into bread and butter classics – every week! Edited by John-Joe Vollans, Classic Car Buyer is backed by a hugely knowledgeable team who have had years of experience running their own classics. That combined with an unending enthusiasm for classic motoring makes for a most informative and entertain read.

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Highly entertaining

Great for all classic car enthusiasts Reviewed 25 April 2022

Classic Car Buyer

Great variety of interesting content, so always a good read. Reviewed 13 January 2021

Classic Car Buyer

Great reading well done Reviewed 29 October 2020

Classic Car Buyer

It is good to see that despite a very difficult time at the moment the Staff manage to keep up the very high standards. Well done to all.
Reviewed 08 April 2020

Top magazine, love reading it!

Top magazine, love reading it! Reviewed 09 February 2016

Articles in this issue


Below is a selection of articles in Classic Car Buyer no.201 Morris Minor- Buy and Run.