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Pocketmags Digital Magazines
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Pocketmags Digital Magazines

Techy tips for family historians

Make the most of digital devices, websites, apps and gadgets, with genealogical web guru Paul Carter

FROM THE WORLD OF TECH

Importing GEDCOM to online family trees

Last month we looked at the GEDCOM standard and how it can facilitate the transfer of research data between family tree packages. In the same way, the online family trees such as those at Ancestry or Findmypast, do accept GEDCOM files. These online trees do have a bad press, often rightly so, as it’s easy to include incorrect data, which weakens the quality of search results for the rest of us.

Recently however, I’ve been adding family members to my Ancestry DNA project and it’s a case where having a public tree can help in establishing possible connections. Rather than building a tree from scratch, I used a GEDCOM export from my family tree software, in this case Reunion for Apple Mac, although other packages will have similar options. I don’t wish to publish all of my research so, before creating the export, I set the privacy filters in Reunion so that nothing more than first initial, surname, birth year and death year were included. I then created the GEDCOM file and imported this to Ancestry as a new public tree.

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About Family Tree

What did your ancestors do for a job? Were they an apprentice? Did they take the King’s Shilling? Or work down the mine? What were the opportunities available to them, and what were the very real hazards of the work they did all day? This issue we’re exploring those employment records that can help you find out more about your ancestors’ work in times gone by. Discovering the history of your ancestors’ employment will give you invaluable insights into the lives they led. What they earned, and how they earned it, will shed light on their income and lifestyle, the communities they lived in, and the roof over their heads. Investigate their work; understand their lives… We have all the info you need to help you do this.