Shopping Cart -

Your cart is currently empty.
Upgrade to today
for only an extra Cxx.xx

You get:

plus This issue of xxxxxxxxxxx.
plus Instant access to the latest issue of 340+ of our top selling titles.
plus Unlimited access to 30000+ back issues
plus No contract or commitment. If you decide that PocketmagsPlus is not for you, you can cancel your monthly subscription online at any time. Auto-renews at $9.99 per month, unless cancelled.
Upgrade for 99c
Then just $9.99 / month. Cancel anytime.
Learn more
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
US
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
Read anywhere Read anywhere
Ways to pay Pocketmags Payment Types
Trusted site
At Pocketmags you get
Secure Billing
Great Offers
Web & App Reader
Gifting Options
Loyalty Points

Worth A Mensen

BRACE YOURSELF FOR A TALE BEYOND BELIEF. A TALE OF SUPER HUMAN ATHLETICISM; WAR; DISCOVERY; IMPERIALISM; MYTH; IMPRISONMENT; CIRCUSACTS; ANDWINE. A TALE NOT OF AN ENTIRE NATION OR ERA, BUT OF ONE MAN: MENSEN ERNST, 19TH CENTURY RUNNER EXTRAORDINAIRE

MENSEN ERNST

Moscow, 1832: Guards at the Kremlin are met with a peculiar sight
Battle of Navarino, 1827: Ernst goes to astonishing lengths to make his taper period more exciting

One morning late in June 1832, the guards at the Kremlin were met with a curious sight. A strangely attired man jogged up to the gate with a peculiarly long and loping gate. Compact and muscular, squat even, he was dressed in a white tunic and black trousers, topped off by a top hat accessorised with a large plume feather that bobbed comically as he ran. The guards took from his dishevelled appearance that he was a beggar, and despite his unintelligible protestations turned him away. Fortunately the man’s true identity was quickly established: this was the famed runner Mensen Ernst, who two weeks earlier had left Paris, having wagered that he could reach Moscow on foot in 15 days. In fact, he did it in 14 (the guards hadn’t expected him until the following day), having covered over 1,600 miles on poorly surfaced roads, swum 13 rivers and been locked up twice, firstly for being insane and then for suspected demonic possession. On the one occasion he escaped by climbing up a chimney, on the other he bet his captors he could outrun a horse, and scarpered in the opposite direction, or so the story goes. And these were by no means the most colourful episodes in the story of this particular madman.

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Men's Running - Jan-18
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.