We use cookies to track usage and preferences. See Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
US
Pocketmags Digital Magazines

A BITING CHANCE

INSIDE THE HALTING, UNDERFUNDED CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT A ZIKA EPIDEMIC IN THE U.S.

ASHUNDREDSOF SHOPPER AND tourists stroll through an outdoor mall south of Miami Beach’s Lincoln Road, a white, unmarked van with tinted windows creeps through a nearby neighborhood. Then a second van appears, and a third and fourth. One eases to the curb and stops under the palms on a block of mostly two-story apartment buildings. As the other three vans silently roll on, three people step out, walk up the stairs into an apartment complex and knock on the first door they come to. One of them holds a clipboard and another an ice cooler—the clipboard for questionnaires; the cooler for samples.

It’s close to 90 degrees outside and nearly 7 p.m., so the folks who just got out of that white van hope the people who live here will be home, preparing dinner. They also hope they might be willing to provide a quick urine sample, because this neighborhood is one of the first spots in the continental United States where active transmission of the Zika virus has been confirmed. Between the end of July and late September, state health officials in Florida confirmed at least 120 cases of locally transmitted Zika, and new cases are reported nearly every day. Authorities have also trapped mosquitoes in Miami-Dade County that test positive for the virus. The unmarked vans and their teams are part of an emergency public health campaign to track the virus, learn how it spreads and do whatever they can to stamp it out.

“LOOK AT THE PEOPLE ON THE BEACH.... HERE ARE READY BLOOD MEALS, WARM BODIES. THE MOSQUITOES ARE LOVING IT.”

For more than a year, Americans have watched from a not-very-safe distance as the Aedes aegpti mosquito—Zika’s principal vector—took bites out of more than 50 countries and territories in Central and South America, as well as the Pacific and Caribbean islands and, most recently, parts of Asia. For months, U.S. federal health officials have warned lawmakers and the public that local transmission of Zika is unavoidable and that the U.S. must do everything possible to ensure a small outbreak won’t spread. But they were hamstrung by a lack of funds, and control efforts in the U.S. were too slow, too meager. Transmission of the virus was first reported in the U.S. on July 29, in Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood. In addition to more than 100 locally acquired cases, Florida’s health department was reporting at least 700 travel related cases. Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified 3,565 cases of travel-associated cases in the continental U.S. since the end of September.

READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Newsweek International - 14th October 2016
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - 14th October 2016
$4.99
Or 499 points
Annual Digital Subscription
Only $ 0.67 per issue
SAVE
87%
$33.99
Or 3399 points
Monthly Digital Subscription
Only $ 0.94 per issue
SAVE
80%
$3.99
Or 399 points

View Issues

About Newsweek International

The Castro Connection - Howe Trump's company violated the U.S. embargo against Cuba.
Ways to Pay Pocketmags Payment Types
At Pocketmags you get Secure Billing Great Offers HTML Reader Gifting options Loyalty Points