We use cookies to track usage and preferences. See Cookie Policy
Pocketmags Digital Magazines
US
Pocketmags Digital Magazines

THE HURTING HEROES OF 9/11

THE ALARMING DEATH TOLL FROM THE ATTACKS ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, IS STILL RISING. THE REASON, DOCTORS SAY: NOXIOUS CHEMICALS RELEASED WHEN THE TOWERS FELL THAT TURNED GROUND ZERO INTO A CESSPOOL OF DEADLY DISEASE
RUSHING INTO HELL: Once the towers fell, thousands of volunteers came to assist in rescue efforts and to clear the rubble.

WHEN PLACIDO PEREZ closes his eyes, he can still see the World Trade Center towers beneath him. On weekends, he would sometimes fly his red-andwhite Cessna along the Hudson River, taking selfies with the towers in the background, stark against a cerulean sky. “I still look at the pictures all the time,” he says. “I remember the good times. It’s what gets you through.”

STILL COUNTING: Only the Battle of Antietam accounted for more American deaths in one day, but the death toll continues to climb as rescue workers get older, and sicker.
FROM LEFT: BETH A. KEISER/AFP/GETTY; DEVIN YALKIN FOR NEWSWEEK; PREVIOUS SPREAD: LYNN JOHNSON/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC/GETTY

Perez also has pictures he took of the September 11, 2001, attacks. He was standing at the base of the towers that morning with a digital camera, not far from where he worked as a manager at a telecommunications company. “I was on my way to work, and, boom, I heard a turbine smash into one of the buildings,” he says. “I remember the sounds and the people jumping [from the towers]. That marble plaza outside of the towers where the globe sculpture was—remember it had speakers? Muzak was playing. They couldn’t stop the music. It was automatic. People were jumping, and debris was flying. It was awful.”

Perez, a licensed emergency medical technician, stayed downtown to help people trying to escape the burning buildings. The next day, he returned to the site and volunteered alongside thousands of police officers, firefighters, construction workers and others to search for survivors. He didn’t leave Ground Zero for a week, working 12- to 14-hour shifts. When he needed rest, he slept at the site.

BED OF TOXINS: Perez volunteered for 12-hour shifts during the rescue efforts and sometimes slept at the site when he was exhausted.
READ MORE
Purchase options below
Find the complete article and many more in this issue of Newsweek International - 16th September 2016
If you own the issue, Login to read the full article now.
Single Issue - 16th September 2016
$4.99
Or 499 points
Annual Digital Subscription
Only $ 0.67 per issue
SAVE
87%
$33.99
Or 3399 points
Monthly Digital Subscription
Only $ 0.94 per issue
SAVE
80%
$3.99
Or 399 points

View Issues

About Newsweek International

9/11's Second wave... 400,000 people have been affected by diseases, cancers and mental illnesses that are all linked to the attacks!
Ways to Pay Pocketmags Payment Types
At Pocketmags you get Secure Billing Great Offers HTML Reader Gifting options Loyalty Points