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WITH PRESIDENT TRUMP CALLING FOR A BORDER WALL, A BAN ON MUSLIMS, MASS DEPORTATIONS AND BLACK SITE PRISONS, WHAT BETTER TIME TO VISIT MANZANAR, WHERE JAPANESE!AMERICANS WERE CONFINED BASED SOLELY ON RACE
YOU CAN GET THERE FROM HERE: At the start of World War II, the U.S. opened 10 camps that interred 120,000 people, including the most famous one, Manzanar, in Northern California.

THE DRIVE from the San Francisco Bay Area to Manzanar, the former Japanese-American internment camp in California’s remote Eastern Sierra region, takes about seven hours. There is no other way to get there, and there is no way to make the drive shorter. For most of the way, I listen to an audiobook: Rick Perlstein’s The Invisible Bridge, about the improbable rise of a B-movie actor to the presidency of the United States.

In 1988, the final full year of his second White House term, Ronald Reagan apologized to the 120,000 Japanese-Americans who’d been conined to internment camps during World War II, of which there were 10 around the nation, and of which Manzanar is the most notorious. The survivors of the camps also received reparations, a rare concession by the American government. “Here we admit a wrong,” Reagan said. “Here we reairm our commitment as a nation to equal justice under the law.” The announcement was made in San Francisco, whose Japantown was cleared out by interment, which began in 1942, about three months after Pearl Harbor.

Some of the survivors of the camps, many of them now aged, watched as Reagan, in a mustard-colored suit, apologized for the sins of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

“I think this is a fine day,” the president added.

THREE DAYS before I went to Manzanar, President Donald Trump had ordered a halt on immigration from seven majority-Muslim countries. He did so via executive order, numbered 13769. Manzanar was created via Executive Order 9066, which will turn 75 years old on February 19. The order did not mention the Japanese, but its intention was very clear.

“It’s in no way a concentration camp,” said one newsreel that showed Japanese-Americans disembarking buses with their suitcases in the high desert of Inyo County, where the rudiments of Manzanar awaited (they would have to build a good deal of the camp themselves).

“To be clear, this is not a Muslim ban, as the media is falsely reporting,” Trump said as protests to his executive order mounted.

Another newsreel: “They are merely dislocated people.”

DISLOCATED PEOPLE: The internment camps set up to hold Japanese-Americans were created by an executive order, like Trump’s attempt to ban several mostly Muslim nations’ immigrants..
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THE WAR ON ALZHEIMER'S This aggressive attempt to prevent Alzheimer’s rather than treating it is the most exciting new development in decades, as well as a radical departure for researchers and the pharmaceutical industry. Traditionally, drug companies have tested their therapies on patients who already have memory loss, trouble thinking and other signs of dementia. It’s been a losing tactic: More than ninety nine percent of all Alzheimer’s drugs have failed tests in the clinic, and the few that have made it to the market only ameliorate some symptoms. No single medicine has been shown to slow the relentless progression of the disease. However this new approach, even partial success an appreciable slowing of brain degeneration could have a big impact, says Dr. Reisa Sperling, a neurologist who directs the Center for Alzheimer’s Researc.
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