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Digital Subscriptions > The Cricketer Magazine > December 2017 > England 2017 summer review

England 2017 summer review

When they were good, they were very, very good, but when they were bad they were horrid…
As the Ashes begins, Simon Barnes evaluates England’s year so far – mixed fortunes in white-ball cricket, carrying batsmen in Tests
Joe Root tossed up in his first Test as captain, then went out and struck 190

By the end of the summer I was convinced that England could beat any and every Test team in the world, including and especially Australia – even in Australia – so long as the opposition agreed to play eight-a-side. I have since amended this stance. After l’affaire Ben Stokes, it had better be sevena- side, and I’m no longer quite as confident of victory.

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About The Cricketer Magazine

England’s greatest batsmen – we asked 27 experts to name their top 5, and collated the results. There are some fascinating choices! The superb Simon Barnes, with the best turn of phrase in sports journalism, on England’s year so far. The feisty Jarrod Kimber on the state of play in Australian cricket. The elegant and massively under-rated David Townsend on Adelaide Oval. A lovely piece on the greatness of Dennis Lillee, by Simon Hughes. A forensic look at the problems at Sussex, by the man in the know, Bruce Talbot.