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Digital Subscriptions > iScot Magazine > Issue 57 OctoberNovember > Boris Johnson’s Abuse of Power

Boris Johnson’s Abuse of Power

Twitter @Jeggit

IN THE RATHER unlikely event readers have somehow failed to notice, “Britain Trump” is a thing. Since becoming Prime Minister, Boris Johnson – who, as a boy, was described as “affronted when criticised for what amounts to a gross failure of responsibility” – has comprehensively damaged the integrity of British politics; adopting both the rhetoric and behaviour of a populist demagogue and affecting a distinctly authoritarian, almost autocratic, style of leadership. In a word, Mr Johnson is doing in Number 10 Downing Street almost exactly what Donald Trump has been doing in 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on the other side of the Atlantic.

It is not simply the case that Johnson has a poor relationship with the truth; a worrying fact accurately summarised by Aidan O’Neill QC in the Edinburgh Court of Session when he said “the Prime Minister is not naturally an honest man,” but that, like America Trump, he is a serial abuser of the power of his office. No doubt, given this author’s unhidden antipathy towards the British government, readers will assume bias, but the evidence abounds, and among the casualties of his insipient strong-man regime are a number of members – now former members – of his own party. Rory Stewart, expelled from the Conservative Party shortly after resigning from Cabinet, recently described the first days of the Johnson administration as being like “a sort of a purge of the Mensheviks in the Russian Revolution.” Conservative politics is and over the years has been many things, but this is an entirely new and deeply concerning departure.

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The one with the 'Sneering Brittannia' on the front cover. Enjoy this cornucopia of Celtic content and read about the real Scotland from a Scottish lens.