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Artlink Magazine Mining - gouging the country Numero posteriore

English 1 Recensioni   •  English   •   Art & Photography (Art) Only €5,99
Co-editors Stephanie Britton and Prof Pat Hoffie:
The world is hungry for minerals and fuel. The land and its value in spiritual as well as economic terms has led to some of the most debated legislation of contemporary times including Australian Aboriginal ownership and land rights, and to scrutiny of questions of the right to exploit or to act as custodian of land. Initially defined as "Terra Nullius" this country is now recognised as an ancient, mineral-rich continent of hotly contested territories. While Australian art has a long history of artists depicting mining operations, the subject comes with new baggage today at a turning point for the community in relation to climate change. This issue digs deep into the seen and unseen impact of big mining and its greed for the rapid and ruthless exploitation of fossil fuels. Artists, artists alliances and arts writers join with environmentalists to raise consciousness about the dangers of mining operations on farmlands, rivers, in remote areas, deserts, and coastal areas, as well as in the depth of the oceans. * Ken Mulvaney writes on the ancient rock art being damaged by proximity to mining operations on the Burrup Peninsula. * The tension around funding for arts, science and community enterprise from mining companies which commonly exploit the prestige of arts projects to varnish their image. Arts patronage can be used as a wedge to buy off the potential community opposition and the custodial burden is getting heavier for Indigenous land holders in many regions. * During the mining boom has support to the arts from mining companies been minimal relative to their profits? Artists include Fiona Hall, Cai Quo-Qiang, Craig Walsh, Jan Senbergs, John Gollings, Ah Xian, and Raymond Arnold. Writers include Daniel Thomas, Sam Cook, David Hansen, Michael Taussig, Judith Blackall, and Jane Deeth. * 3 important long-form texts are available exclusively online by David Watson, Barry Craig, and Ainslie Murray et al.
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Artlink Magazine

Mining - gouging the country Co-editors Stephanie Britton and Prof Pat Hoffie: The world is hungry for minerals and fuel. The land and its value in spiritual as well as economic terms has led to some of the most debated legislation of contemporary times including Australian Aboriginal ownership and land rights, and to scrutiny of questions of the right to exploit or to act as custodian of land. Initially defined as "Terra Nullius" this country is now recognised as an ancient, mineral-rich continent of hotly contested territories. While Australian art has a long history of artists depicting mining operations, the subject comes with new baggage today at a turning point for the community in relation to climate change. This issue digs deep into the seen and unseen impact of big mining and its greed for the rapid and ruthless exploitation of fossil fuels. Artists, artists alliances and arts writers join with environmentalists to raise consciousness about the dangers of mining operations on farmlands, rivers, in remote areas, deserts, and coastal areas, as well as in the depth of the oceans. * Ken Mulvaney writes on the ancient rock art being damaged by proximity to mining operations on the Burrup Peninsula. * The tension around funding for arts, science and community enterprise from mining companies which commonly exploit the prestige of arts projects to varnish their image. Arts patronage can be used as a wedge to buy off the potential community opposition and the custodial burden is getting heavier for Indigenous land holders in many regions. * During the mining boom has support to the arts from mining companies been minimal relative to their profits? Artists include Fiona Hall, Cai Quo-Qiang, Craig Walsh, Jan Senbergs, John Gollings, Ah Xian, and Raymond Arnold. Writers include Daniel Thomas, Sam Cook, David Hansen, Michael Taussig, Judith Blackall, and Jane Deeth. * 3 important long-form texts are available exclusively online by David Watson, Barry Craig, and Ainslie Murray et al.


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Artlink Magazine  |  Mining - gouging the country  


Co-editors Stephanie Britton and Prof Pat Hoffie:
The world is hungry for minerals and fuel. The land and its value in spiritual as well as economic terms has led to some of the most debated legislation of contemporary times including Australian Aboriginal ownership and land rights, and to scrutiny of questions of the right to exploit or to act as custodian of land. Initially defined as "Terra Nullius" this country is now recognised as an ancient, mineral-rich continent of hotly contested territories. While Australian art has a long history of artists depicting mining operations, the subject comes with new baggage today at a turning point for the community in relation to climate change. This issue digs deep into the seen and unseen impact of big mining and its greed for the rapid and ruthless exploitation of fossil fuels. Artists, artists alliances and arts writers join with environmentalists to raise consciousness about the dangers of mining operations on farmlands, rivers, in remote areas, deserts, and coastal areas, as well as in the depth of the oceans. * Ken Mulvaney writes on the ancient rock art being damaged by proximity to mining operations on the Burrup Peninsula. * The tension around funding for arts, science and community enterprise from mining companies which commonly exploit the prestige of arts projects to varnish their image. Arts patronage can be used as a wedge to buy off the potential community opposition and the custodial burden is getting heavier for Indigenous land holders in many regions. * During the mining boom has support to the arts from mining companies been minimal relative to their profits? Artists include Fiona Hall, Cai Quo-Qiang, Craig Walsh, Jan Senbergs, John Gollings, Ah Xian, and Raymond Arnold. Writers include Daniel Thomas, Sam Cook, David Hansen, Michael Taussig, Judith Blackall, and Jane Deeth. * 3 important long-form texts are available exclusively online by David Watson, Barry Craig, and Ainslie Murray et al.
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Artlink is widely known as a leading contemporary visual art magazine in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. Each issue creatively explores a theme relevant to contemporary art and culture. Artlink is renowned for its original choice of topics, readability, cutting edge editorial and excellent production values. Articles are written by leading writers, including well-known curators and academics. Artlink is a valuable reference, ideal for artists, students, arts professionals and anyone with a general interest in the visual arts. A key tool for researchers, it is frequently cited as being the publication which best informs readers about current practice in a diverse range of media and each issue is lavishly illustrated with new work by artists and groups. Exhibition and book reviews give a critical view of established and emerging art practice. Back issues are packed with exciting, evergreen debates and research including analysis, commentary, gossip, news and information. Essential for anyone interested in contemporary arts in the Asia Pacific region. Artlink is one of Australia’s longest established art publications. Be surprised and delighted by every new themed issue, masterminded by a range of daring guest editors and enjoy the curiosity and originality in the way contemporary art is represented.

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Great Contemporary visual art magazine covering Australia and Pacific

Great Contemporary visual art magazine covering Australia and Pacific Recensito venerdì 19 giugno 2020
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