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Digital Subscriptions > Newsweek International > 13th April 2018 > Lioness in Winter

Lioness in Winter

Glenda Jackson returns to Broadway after 30 years, in Three Tall Women. At 81, she can still level a room with one glance

THEATER

ONE TOUGH MOTHER Jackson in the Edward Albee revival. As “A,” she plays the oldest version of a woman in three stages of her life.
BRIGITTE LACOMBE
COURTESY OF BRUCE STEPHENSON/MAGIC STONE PRODUCTIONS

WORST IN SHOW

The Room is bad, but is it the best bad movie ever made?

AFTER 23 YEARS AS A MEMBER OF THE BRITISH Parliament, Glenda Jackson returned to acting as only she would, ferociously, as King Lear in an acclaimed 2016 production at London’s Old Vic. That she vanquished Shakespeare’s mad king without any particular fuss made over the part being played by a woman was unsurprising to a Jackson completist. Consider her first starring film role, in Ken Russell’s Women in Love, an adaptation of D.H. Lawrence’s psychosexual novel. What got the most attention when the film debuted was a homoerotic nude wrestling match between its male stars, Alan Bates and Oliver Reed. Watching it now, that moment seems quaint, as does the film. Jackson’s Oscar-winning performance, as Gudrun Brangwen, Lawrence’s man-killer, on the other hand, remains singularly fierce and brazen. She looks like no movie star before her, and not many after.

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About Newsweek International

SIX MORE YEARS It was close to midnight on March 18th and a triumphant Vladimir Putin stood at a podium at his campaign headquarters near Red Square. Dressed in a jacket and open-necked shirt, Russia’s longtime leader looked weary but satisfied. He had just secured a fourth presidential term in a landslide election, extending his rule for another six years, until 2024 and maybe beyond. What will that mean for America and the world?