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Digital Subscriptions > Newsweek International > 19th January 2018 > ‘I Will Have to Answer Only to God’

‘I Will Have to Answer Only to God’

WE KNOW WHO KILLED THREE PEOPLE AND MAIMED 260 MORE IN THAT SHOCKING ACT OF DOMESTIC TERRORISM FIVE YEARS AGO AT THE BOSTON MARATHON. BUT WHOEVER BUILT THE BOMBS THAT RIPPED APART SO MANY LIVES IS STILL ON THE LOOSE, STILL CAPABLE OF KILLING AGAIN

BOMBS

Photograph by THE VOORHES

AT 2:40 A.M. ON JUNE 9, 2013, SERGEANT DETECTIVE GARY HAYWARD WAS DISPATCHED TO AN ADDRESS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE TONY TOWN OF TOPSFIELD, IN THE NORTH SHORE REGION OF MASSACHUSETTS. THERE, HE FOUND AN ELDERLY WOMAN ON A BENCH OUTSIDE THE TOWN LIBRARY IN HER BATHROBE, SOBBING, HER DISHEVELED AND DISTRAUGHT COMPANION BESIDE HER.

HAYWARD, A PATIENT MAN WITH A CALM DEMEANOR HONED OVER nearly 30 years in law enforcement, sat with the woman, Glenda Duckworth, as she described being forced to climb out of her bedroom window to escape her 6-foot-2, 240-pound son, Daniel Morley, after he attacked her, yelling, “Witch, burn in hell!” She said her son snatched her eyeglasses off her face and began melting them on the stove, threw her in a chair and forcibly drew cat whiskers on her cheeks with a marker, and then chased her into her bedroom, where he jumped on top of her longtime partner, David Bloss. As Bloss begged, “Help me, Glenda!,” she climbed out of the window. Bloss wriggled out from under the 27-year-old Morley and escaped out that same window. Together they called 911 from Bloss’s cellphone.

Hayward took copious notes as the terrified couple described Morley’s breakdown, which had been building over the previous eight weeks, since the day two bombs were detonated near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Morley’s mother had grown so concerned about his behavior that she’d made a psychiatrist appointment for him, which she reminded him of as he assaulted her—“I am your mother, and you need help!”— according to the affidavit she swore out later that day to get a restraining order against him. Her son, Duckworth explained, had long struggled with mental health issues, but since the Boston Marathon bombing, he had become “very dark.”

On the morning of April 15, 2013, hours before the explosions, Bloss told detectives, Morley was helping with yard work when he took a phone call, then left without a word. His behavior made Bloss uneasy, so much so that when the news of the deadly explosions on Boylston Street broke, he asked Duckworth, “Where is your son?”

Morley did not come home for two days. When he did, he merely told Duckworth he had gone fishing in Maine with a friend. “His mother was worried,” Hayward recalled during a recent interview with Newsweek, adding that she was also shocked by her son’s callous reaction to the deadly bombings. According to court records, when Duckworth told her son that some of their neighbors had been injured by the blasts and hospitalized, he stared coldly at her and said, “What’s the big deal? People are dying all over the place.”

Bloss told Hayward that Morley also called the two young women and the boy killed by the explosions “collateral damage.”

Hayward took careful notes as the couple talked. Those notes, contained in court documents obtained by Newsweek, are now part of a large, complicated argument about suspicions that continue to haunt local law enforcement five years after the marathon bombings. The authorities are sure they captured the two men who carried out that deadly attack—Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his brother, Dzhokhar—but they don’t know who made the bombs they used that day or the explosives they had with them a few days later, when they were cornered by various law enforcement officers and agents. They are certain the Tsarnaev brothers didn’t make those bombs. So who did?

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About Newsweek International

In this weeks Newsweek Int. - Whoever built the bombs that were used at the 2013 Boston Marathon is still on the loose. - Legalized pot was supposed to hurt the Mexican cartels, but narcos in California may be using it to plant the seeds of a takeover.