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Cage & Aviary Birds Magazine No.5766 Birds fit for a King Back Issue

English
110 Reviews   •  English   •   Family & Home (Animals & Pets)
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This week I'm reminded yet again of the phenomenal and selfless commitment that so many birdkeepers make to the wellbeing of their charges. It’s nearly always an unsung commitment. Any “reward” comes, of course, from the birds themselves. In Zurich, there’s a facility called a “bird drop”. Anybody with an unwanted pet bird can simply leave it at the Voliere rescue centre, where a wonderful lady named Elisabeth Kehl, or one of her colleagues, will take charge of it. They take in “abandoned” baby wild birds, too, as Rosemary Low reports on page 11. I was stunned at the casual-sounding nature of this system – and humbled at Ms Kehl’s devotion. In Kent, there’s a raptor centre called Eagle Heights, where some of the world’s most exciting species can be
admired by the public in exemplary conditions (see page 18). How did it get started? Says founder
Alan Ames: “I borrowed money, remortgaged the house, resigned from my job and away I went.” The commitment is almost frightening, yet it’s clear Mr Ames is abundantly rewarded by his beloved raptors. Bill Naylor also reminds us that you get back what you put in. For years, Bill has been helped, as he writes his regular Cage & Aviary Birds articles, by the cheery presence of his female African grey Charlie, a rewarding companion if ever there was one. Now, Charlie is no longer there. Bill’s clear-eyed and thoughtful account of her passing is on page 13, and I feel it will chime a chord with all those who have lost a faithful avian friend. There was another sort of loss at Cage & Aviary Birds last Thursday when we said goodbye to the retiring Lynn Sullivan. Lynn and the rest of us have been greatly moved by your flood of well-wishing messages. Heartfelt thanks to everyone who has written, emailed or phoned. We will of course continue to pass all your good wishes on to Lynn.
Enjoy your birds this week.
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Cage & Aviary Birds

No.5766 Birds fit for a King This week I'm reminded yet again of the phenomenal and selfless commitment that so many birdkeepers make to the wellbeing of their charges. It’s nearly always an unsung commitment. Any “reward” comes, of course, from the birds themselves. In Zurich, there’s a facility called a “bird drop”. Anybody with an unwanted pet bird can simply leave it at the Voliere rescue centre, where a wonderful lady named Elisabeth Kehl, or one of her colleagues, will take charge of it. They take in “abandoned” baby wild birds, too, as Rosemary Low reports on page 11. I was stunned at the casual-sounding nature of this system – and humbled at Ms Kehl’s devotion. In Kent, there’s a raptor centre called Eagle Heights, where some of the world’s most exciting species can be admired by the public in exemplary conditions (see page 18). How did it get started? Says founder Alan Ames: “I borrowed money, remortgaged the house, resigned from my job and away I went.” The commitment is almost frightening, yet it’s clear Mr Ames is abundantly rewarded by his beloved raptors. Bill Naylor also reminds us that you get back what you put in. For years, Bill has been helped, as he writes his regular Cage & Aviary Birds articles, by the cheery presence of his female African grey Charlie, a rewarding companion if ever there was one. Now, Charlie is no longer there. Bill’s clear-eyed and thoughtful account of her passing is on page 13, and I feel it will chime a chord with all those who have lost a faithful avian friend. There was another sort of loss at Cage & Aviary Birds last Thursday when we said goodbye to the retiring Lynn Sullivan. Lynn and the rest of us have been greatly moved by your flood of well-wishing messages. Heartfelt thanks to everyone who has written, emailed or phoned. We will of course continue to pass all your good wishes on to Lynn. Enjoy your birds this week.


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Cage & Aviary Birds  |  No.5766 Birds fit for a King  


This week I'm reminded yet again of the phenomenal and selfless commitment that so many birdkeepers make to the wellbeing of their charges. It’s nearly always an unsung commitment. Any “reward” comes, of course, from the birds themselves. In Zurich, there’s a facility called a “bird drop”. Anybody with an unwanted pet bird can simply leave it at the Voliere rescue centre, where a wonderful lady named Elisabeth Kehl, or one of her colleagues, will take charge of it. They take in “abandoned” baby wild birds, too, as Rosemary Low reports on page 11. I was stunned at the casual-sounding nature of this system – and humbled at Ms Kehl’s devotion. In Kent, there’s a raptor centre called Eagle Heights, where some of the world’s most exciting species can be
admired by the public in exemplary conditions (see page 18). How did it get started? Says founder
Alan Ames: “I borrowed money, remortgaged the house, resigned from my job and away I went.” The commitment is almost frightening, yet it’s clear Mr Ames is abundantly rewarded by his beloved raptors. Bill Naylor also reminds us that you get back what you put in. For years, Bill has been helped, as he writes his regular Cage & Aviary Birds articles, by the cheery presence of his female African grey Charlie, a rewarding companion if ever there was one. Now, Charlie is no longer there. Bill’s clear-eyed and thoughtful account of her passing is on page 13, and I feel it will chime a chord with all those who have lost a faithful avian friend. There was another sort of loss at Cage & Aviary Birds last Thursday when we said goodbye to the retiring Lynn Sullivan. Lynn and the rest of us have been greatly moved by your flood of well-wishing messages. Heartfelt thanks to everyone who has written, emailed or phoned. We will of course continue to pass all your good wishes on to Lynn.
Enjoy your birds this week.
read more read less
Cage & Aviary Birds is the world’s only weekly newspaper for birdkeepers. Written by bird experts for bird fans, it is packed with news, advice and comment from the avicultural scene. An essential resource for members of bird clubs and societies, it also offers an unrivalled marketplace for sellers and buyers of birds and all bird-related products, both in the British Isles and around the world.
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While it’s first and foremost a newspaper, each issue also offers a wealth of practical advice and tips from the top names in the bird world, plus opinion, controversy, species and hobbyist profiles, humour and nostalgia. Bargain-hunters eagerly await their copy to scan its paid and free adverts, and it is quite simply The Bible for show reports, club news and events.
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