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Digital Subscriptions > Vegan Food & Living Magazine > Vegan Food & Living May 18 > Energy Bites

Energy Bites

Christine Bailey’s bite-size energy boosters are quick to make and full of nutritious ingredients

What do you need for a good energy bite?

DRY INGREDIENTS

Nuts are incredibly nutrient-dense with a good combination of healthy fats and protein. They can also supply essential vitamins and minerals including zinc, calcium, B vitamins, magnesium, potassium and manganese. In many recipes the types of nuts are interchangeable. You can grind them up to form a flour as the base of bites or you can use them finely chopped to add texture.

Seeds are equally nutrient-dense and some, such as chia, flaxseed and hemp, are also rich in the essential omega-3 fatty acids that are important for heart health, lowering inflammation and supporting brain function. Ground seeds are readily available or you can grind your own in a blender, juicer or food processor. Ground flaxseed and chia seeds are very absorbent and can be used interchangeably with each other, but not as a replacement for other seeds or nuts. They are particularly useful to help bind the energy bites.

Desiccated coconut and coconut flakes (choose unsweetened brands) are simply coconut flesh that has been grated and dried. They are a good source of fibre, manganese and copper, which supports energy production. They also contain medium-chain triglycerides – a type of saturated fat the body can use readily for energy.

Porridge oats and gluten-free grains provide a nutritious base in energy bites. Oats are high in fibre, including beta glucans, which have been shown to support immune health and lower cholesterol. With their low glycaemic index (GI), oats help balance blood sugar levels, keeping you energised and feeling fuller for longer. Oats are also packed with an array of vitamins and minerals, including B vitamins, magnesium, zinc and manganese. If you are following a gluten-free diet, make sure you select certified gluten-free oats or use an alternative such as quinoa, millet, buckwheat flakes or puff ed rice.

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About Vegan Food & Living Magazine

Missing cheese since you went vegan? You no longer have to as the May issue of Vegan Food & Living is dedicated to getting you making cheese from the comfort of your own home. We've got recipes for everything from smoked hickory to herbed feta and Swiss cheese, and if you don't have time to make it yourself, we put cheese to the test to find the best varieties available to buy. Also this issue, we find out if you need to take supplements or if you can get everything you need from your diet, we find out how to live ethically on a budget, 10 ways to make yourself happy today and how to attract more men to the vegan movement.